Reading · The Classics Club

Completed: The Return of Sherlock Holmes

Cover: The Return of Sherlock HolmesThe Return of Sherlock Holmes
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
1905, Scotland

 “Come, Watson, come!” he cried. “The game is afoot. Not a word! Into your clothes and come!”

(“The Adventure of the Abbey Grange”)

Just a quick post to note that I’ve finally finished the 6th of the Sherlock Holmes titles on my Classics Club list (or 5th book in the 8-volume set I’ve borrowed from my Dad).  This is hands down the longest of the books, which, without actually checking to confirm this assumption, I believe is because the short stories in this collection are lengthier than those in the other collections, not because there are more stories. Certainly, it seemed to take longer to read each story. Although I’ve stated in the past that my problem with the short stories is that it often felt as if there weren’t enough Homes–here that is no problem–the problem here was that it felt at times as if the book was endless! (I’m so fickle.) I’m sure that had absolutely nothing to do with the fact that since starting this collection I’ve finished four other books. Nope, can’t possibly be my fault.

That said, I did enjoy the stories for the most part. Some I worked out much to early in the story (“The Adventure of the Norwood Builder” in particular). Some I was just “meh” about. But I quite enjoyed “The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist” and “The Adventure of the Priory School.” My memory of the earlier story collections my not be accurate, but it seemed that in this collection–the two last mentioned stories being examples–we see much more of Holmes outside of the murky London that I more strongly associate with Holmes. There are even two stories set in university towns (I envision Cambridge or Oxford), a setting that reminds me of the Inspector Lewis TV series rather than Holmes–and it was a delight to see Holmes there.

Of course, these being stories of their time, there is also on occasion the tidbit to make the 21st century reader squirm a bit. In “The Adventure of the Six Napoleons” (which my notes emphasize refers to busts of Napoleon, not the pastry!), specifically, the terms “simian” and “ape-like” are used to describe the villain–an Italian. Although Doyle evidently had an interest in phrenology (see The Hound of the Baskervilles), and could perhaps just be using this to emphasize the evil nature of the character, the knowledge that many people of the time had an anti-Italian bias, makes me think this plays a factor. Squirmy…but also illustrative of the period. For that matter, the Holmes stories also often illustrate the limitations placed on the women in the era. (Examples here are “The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist” and “The Adventure of the Second Stain.”)

All in all, I enjoyed making my way through the collection, but am more than happy to take a bit of a break from Holmes. Apparently I’m not a true Holmesian! (On the other hand it was quite fun to recognize references or stories used in the most recent series of Sherlock, references I had not previously known.)

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4 thoughts on “Completed: The Return of Sherlock Holmes

  1. I love the quote at the top, it shows how much language has changed. Today it could be “Get up! We’ve got game! Don’t argue, get dressed, let’s get going!”

    1. Thanks! I hadn’t thought of it in terms of changing language but I suppose that’s true. It seemed like a quote that was representative of the Holmes stories.

  2. Ah, it was so nice and relaxing to read your review, Amanda! I’m reading so many heavy books lately that it would be nice to read something fresh and light, like Holmes or Poirot.

    I’ll be watching to see what you choose to read next!

    1. Thanks, Cleo! It was actually one of the easier (more relaxing) posts I’ve written lately. Nice when that happens. I hope you find some time for a nice light book soon!

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